Posts tagged client
Printing Will & Meggie
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I've been printing like a mad woman these past few weeks. I've also been carrying around my camera to capture process for you. (Yes, you!)

Here's a behind the scenes look at the 48 hour whirlwind that was printing Will & Meggie's wedding invites. Since this design required a long skinny image, I jumped in the car and went to West Seattle to borrow Myrtle Alley Press' Vandercook. This press is a beast. It can print up to 18" x 24", and requires about a week of energy to print for a day. (Picture me, sweaty and tired.)

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The plate for printing the first color on the interior. Big big plate!

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I really like pictures of tools.

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The first color, on the page. How pretty is the texture on that banged up feed board?

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Plate for the second color on the interior.

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I like big stacks of paper.

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Back to C&Co. and our Chandler & Price. Time to print the clouds!

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This is a great example of what white ink looks like when printed on colored paper. It's semi-transparent, kind of milky, and looks like clouds. Great for this application, not great for others.

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More beautiful stacks of 50. Repetition is soothing.

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Plate for the invite's front on our C&P.

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First color on the front.

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Here come more clouds!

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These clouds were really fun to print.

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Final steps: Scoring the pieces to fold and sewing machine perforation! The sewing machine isn't a great method for high quantities, but worked great for these 150 invites.

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All done!

The Letterpress Printing Process: Sean & Emily
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Hello friends!  I recently had an out-of-town bride ask for photos of the printing process, and I was glad to oblige. So I grabbed my camera and took a photo of each step of the process.

This is a rather detailed look at how we produce our client projects. Feel free to comment with your questions. I'd love to answer them!

1) Design the invitation suite digitally in Adobe Illustrator. (The design process has several more steps, but we'll save that for another day.)

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2) Prepare the finished design as a pdf to send out for photopolymer printing plates to be made at Boxcar Press. This is also when we order the paper, envelopes, etc. that the client has chosen.

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3) When the plates arrive, carefully cut them apart into the appropriate sections.

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4) Rev up the paper cutter (just kidding, it's manual) and cut down the parent sized sheets to the sizes required. This lovely gray paper is Magnani Pescia, an insanely beautiful 100% cotton paper made in Italy.

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5) Mix ink to the client's chosen Pantone colors. (We send out Pantone chips, paper samples and envelope samples to the client for final choices before placing orders.)

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Hello Josephine!

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6) Ink up the press.

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My drawer of printing tools and supplies.

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7) Grab the tape! (This cool trick is something I learned from the great Chandler O'Leary.) Measure the design and place the plate in the appropriate position with tape. Place the sheet of paper with the plate taped to it on the guide pins (the little doo-dads that hold the paper in place), and carefully close the press on the printing plate.

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The plate will be in approximately the right place! Cool, huh?

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8 ) Make the first print.

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9) Measure the margins of the piece, and move the guide pins incrementally until the design is straight, centered, and looks correct.

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10) Print the first color of the run!

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11) Stack those babies! We use a rubber based ink that soaks into the paper, making the pieces able to be stacked right away. This repurposed library cart is my favorite thing.

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12) Clean the press.

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13) Repeat steps 6-12 for the rest of the colors & pieces!

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Measurements & notes

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Back to the tape trick

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First color on the RSVP card

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Stack of "make ready" - the paper used to get the measurements, inking, color, etc. correct before printing the run

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The finished invitation suite! Ta da!

4gency
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We recently had the pleasure of working with Charles from 4gency, a local video game development company. 4gency specializes in espionage-based games for mobile and tablet platforms. With the launch of their first game Node.hack, 4gency needed business cards that live up to "the world of spies and secrets."

We scoured the web for redacted documents in the name of "research," and had a lot of fun doing it. This is undoubtedly our favorite business card job to date. I love how the texture of the paper and printing comes through in the black card, and the stark contrast of colors on the white card. It's eye candy, man. This is one of those jobs that exceeded my expectations. I love when I get the chance to let my printing press do her thing!

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Your objective? Check out 4gency's great new site, and play Node.hack!